Pulsatilla vulgaris pink-flowered

Ranunculaceae

 

Habitat: chalk grassland

 

Soil: well drained, best with chalk / limestone

 

Height: 30 cm

 

Flowering: spring

 

Width: 25 cm

           


           

The pasque flowers are a delight in the spring, with their multiply dissected leaves and large, silky flowers. These come in a variety of colours, but always have the colour of the petals (strictly tepals) repeated in the stigma, with these two areas of matching colour separated by a ring of bright yellow stamens. Flowers are followed by wonderful fluffy seeds. They are all excellent plants for a rock garden or raised bed. It is said that they resent being moved, but also that they can be propagated by root cuttings! Take your pick: my advice is to leave them alone.

Pulsatilla vulgaris pink-flowered is a lovely colour form of the pasque flower, with pale posy pink petals and stigma, separated by a ring of yellow stamens.
XVP-9
9 cm pot £4.00

Pulsatilla - some other suggestions
pulsatilla_alpina_apiifolia.jpg Pulsatilla alpina subsp. apiifolia is the form of this popular species with pale yellow flowers, abundant in many places in the European alps. It is long-lived, making an ever-increasing clump in the garden.
invisible.gif Pulsatilla ambigua is a charming species, with more compact and divided foliage than P. vulgaris. Upright stems bear finely hairy purple flowers with red tinged interiors and golden stamens.
invisible.gif Pulsatilla campanella is a rare, dwarf species, which produces a few tufts of silvery, softly hairy foliage. The deep violet, bell-shaped flowers have a furry covering and bright golden stamens. Due to its small size, it is best grown in a trough, raised bed or rockery.
pulsatilla_rubra.jpg Pulsatilla rubra has, as its name implies, red flowers, and as is usual in the genus, the central cone carrying the stigma is colour coordinated with the petals, with the yellow stamens making a colourful contrast. The leaves, multiply divided to give a feathery appearance, are bright green.
invisible.gif Pulsatilla serotina has attractive violet-purple flowers, with bright yellow central stamens, above the feathery foliage.
pulsatilla_vulgaris.jpg Pulsatilla vulgaris is the pasque flower, a delight in the spring, with its multiply dissected leaves and large, silky flowers. This is the most usual form, with lavender petals and stigma, separated by a ring of yellow stamens.
invisible.gif Pulsatilla vulgaris 'Alba' is a white-flowered form, so it has white petals (with silvery grey or purplish colour on the back) and a white stigma, contrasting with the yellow stamens. These are seed-raised plants, so the colour cannot be guaranteed, although the majority do come true.
pulsatilla_rubra.jpg Pulsatilla vulgaris red form has, as its name implies, red flowers, and as is usual in the genus, the central cone carrying the stigma is colour coordinated with the petals, with the yellow stamens making a colourful contrast. The leaves, multiply divided to give a feathery appearance, are bright green.