Primula japonica 'Glowing Embers'

Primulaceae

 

Habitat: moist places, shade or part shade

 

Soil: rich, with lots of humus

 

Height: 80 cm

 

Flowering: May to July

 

Width: 30 cm

           


           

The candelabra primulas (the Proliferae section) are wonderful plants, originating from China and the Himalaya, for woodland or damp, even extremely wet, places. They make clumps of strong leaves, deciduous in some species and persisting through the winter in others, and then send up their tall stems. At intervals up the stems there are whorls of ten or so flowers, each ring opening in succession, perhaps one every five or six days, . As there can be up to six, even seven, whorls, that gives an exceptional flowering period. So there can be a mass of colour and that colour can be brilliant orange or yellow, red, pink, white, even dark maroon.

Primula japonica 'Glowing Embers' is a variety of this easy, vigorous candelabra primula with rich mauve/pink flowers.
PJG-1
1 litre pot £6.00

Primula Proliferae section (candelabra) - some other suggestions
primula_kevock_surprise4.jpg Primula x anisodoxa 'Kevock Surprise' is an exceptionally good form of a hybrid that arises very rarely in the garden. The name comes from primulas anisodora and helodoxa - both of which have been replaced, but the hybrid name is still valid! Wilsonii flowers late in the season and has very deep red flowers with a yellow eye; prolifera is early, vigorous, and has bright yellow flowers. This hybrid can flower from June to August, and has dark red buds, just like wilsonii, but they open to a rich salmon pin, with a clear yellow eye, and they become paler as they mature. As several whorls of flowers can be open at any one time, there is a surprising range of colour.
primula_aurantiaca.jpg Primula aurantiaca has several whorls of flowers, red in bud and orange when open, and with red flowers stems and red mid-ribs to the leaves, it is very colourful. It is somewhat shorter than most other members of the section.
primula_beesiana4.jpg Primula beesiana flowers later than most primulas in this section, and they die down completely in winter. This sub-species of Primula bulleyana has light reddish purple flowers, with a yellow eye.
primula_bulleyana.jpg Primula beesiana was collected originally by George Forrest, and named after the sponsor of his first expedition to China. It is a great garden plant (we have plants that are at least 20 years old), with whorls of orange-yellow flowers.
primula_serratifolia_flowers.jpg Primula biserrata is rarely seen in cultivation and is of limited distribution in the wild. It comes from openings in very wet woods, high (3800 m) in the mountains. There are one or two whorls of yellow flowers, with a stripe of white along the centre line of each petal, or the colouring may be pale yellow with a deeper yellow stripe. Either way, the very centre of the flower is orange.
primula_x_bulleesiana2.jpg Primula x bulleesiana has dark red flowers with a yellow eye. Colours are somewhat variable, as they are hybrids between Primulas bulleyana (yellow-orange) and beesiana (pinky-purple)..
primula_bulleyana.jpg Primula bulleyana has four or five whorls of flowers opening in succession up to stems. The flowers are orange/yellow, and appear later than those of most members of the section. Dies down completely in winter.
primula_burmanica5.jpg Primula burmanica has up to half a dozen whorls of deep red flowers. It is distinguished from Primula beesiana by its lack of farina (white meal) on stems and leaves, and from some red forms of Primula japonica by ... not a lot.
primula_chungensis.jpg Primula chungensis is one of the earliest to flower of the candelabra primulas, rather smaller than most, with about five or six whorls of flowers, orange in bud but opening to an orangey yellow. The foliage dies down for the winter.
IMG_7757.jpg Primula chungensis vermilion form is one of the earliest to flower of the candelabra primulas, rather smaller than most, with about five or six whorls of flowers. In the forms usually seen in cultivation they are orange in bud but opening to an orangey yellow, but in this form the flowers are brilliant reddish orange - much like Primula cockburniana or the famed 'Inverewe'.
primula_cockburniana_yellow.jpg Primula cockburniana 'Kevock Sunshine' is a rare form of this small candelabra primula, with yellow flowers. We have isolated a strain that now gives only yellow-flowered plants, usually with two or three whorls of flowers opening in succession up the flower stems. The foliage dies down for the winter.
primula_inverewe3.jpg Primula 'Inverewe' is a hybrid between two of the candelabra primulas, P. pulverulenta and P. cockburniana. As it does not set seed, it can only be propagated by division of plants, and so remains uncommon. It has up to six or seven whorls of bright orange flowers opening in succession up the flower stems. Rosettes of leaves stay green throughout the winter.
primula_japonica_apple_blossom.jpg Primula japonica 'Apple Blossom' is a robust candelabra primula, one of the earliest to flower, with about six whorls of large flowers, just as its name implies, a lovely pale pink, with a red eye. The foliage dies down for the winter, reappearing in early spring.
primula_japonica_carminea3.jpg Primula japonica 'Carminea' is a vigorous woodland plant with gorgeous, deep carmine red flowers.
primula_japonica_postford_white.jpg Primula japonica 'Fuji' is a form of this woodland species with tiers of white flowers with a yellow eye. It is sometimes known as 'Fuji White' and sometimes as Fuji hybrids, but there is nothing that I can see to suggest that it is a hybrid. Like all Primula japonica colour forms, it usually comes true from seed.
primula_japonica_millers_crimson.jpg Primula japonica 'Miller's Crimson' is a variety of this splendid, easy garden plant that has been loved for many years, with deep, ruby red flowers with an even darker eye.
invisible.gif Primula japonica 'Oriental Sunrise' is a candelabra primula with warm, deep red flowers. It dies down completely in the winter, but makes vigorous growth through the spring and summer.
primula_japonica_postford_white.jpg Primula japonica 'Postford White' is an excellent form of this excellent species, with white flowers with a yellow eye. It is the earliest of all the candelabra primulas to flower with us.
invisible.gif Primula japonica 'Valley Red' is a variety that has been around for a long time, although it is a recent addition to our collection. It has scarlet flowers with an orange eye.
invisible.gif Primula japonica violet are plants grown from seed from a parent with violet flowers. Any blue colour in Primula japonica is unusual, so we await the flowering of these plants with interest.
primula_miyabeana4.jpg Primula miyabeana is not often found in cultivation. It comes from Taiwan, and has whorls of bright, rich pink flowers and unusual leafy bracts.
invisible.gif Primula 'Orange Flame' is a hybrid grown by Jim Jermyn, with bright orange flowers, not unlike those of 'Inverewe', perhaps a little less bright and with the plants not quite so tall. But 'Orange Flame differs importantly in being fertile.
primula_poissonii2.jpg Primula poissonii has whorls of extremely bright, rich pink flowers with yellow eyes. It is the latest of the candelabra primulas to flower with us and in the wild, and we may even have a few flowers remaining until Christmas.
primula_prenantha.jpg Primula prenantha is one of the tiniest of the candelabra primulas, nothing like the size of the commonly seen garden species. It has quite dark green leaves, and the short stems have one or two whorls of the yellow flowers with dark calyces. Quite a distinctive plant. These plants originated from seed collected in the Kanchenjunga area.
primula_helodoxa.jpg Primula prolifera has up to six or seven whorls of bright yellow flowers opening in succession up the flower stems. The rosettes of leaves stay green throughout the winter. Primula prolifera is probably the same as Primula helodoxa, at least so far as cultivated plants are concerned.
primula_pulverulenta12.jpg Primula pulverulenta has up to about six whorls of deep pink flowers with an even deeper maroon eye, opening in succession up the flower stems. The stems and leaves are coated with creamy-white flour ('farina'). The rosettes of leaves die down in the winter.
primula_pulverulenta_bartley2.jpg Primula pulverulenta Bartley hybrids is our favourite candelabra primula, in a group that has plenty of excellent competitors. It has up to six or even seven whorls of rosy pink flowers with a yellow eye, and as they open in succession up the flower stems there are flowers for two months or more.
primula_secundiflora.jpg Primula secundiflora looks like a member of the Sikkimensis section, with a couple of whorls of flowers, each with a short stem, so that the flowers hang down. But it is in the candelabra (Proliferae) section, and its (rare) hybridising habits confirm that this is correct. It has evergreen rosettes of quite small leaves, and upright stems with red-pink flowers and distinctive dark/light striped calyces. These are seed-raised plants from garden stock.
primula_secundiflora.jpg Primula secundiflora is from meadows, occasionally wet. It has evergreen rosettes of quite small leaves, and upright stems with red-pink flowers and distinctive dark/light striped calyces.
primula_stenodonta2.jpg Primula stenodonta is related to Primula poissonii, and the taxonomy is confused, but it is a splendid addition to the candelabra primulas. It has whorls of very bright, rich pink flowers, with a darker pink stripe along each petal and with a yellow eye to the flower. It flowers a week or so earlier than P. poissonii, and has larger flowers on arching, longer pedicels, so the total impact is greater. There are other differences, including the lack of a significant notch in each petal and the details of the leaf shape.
primula_anisodora.jpg Primula wilsonii var. anisodora is an evergreen Primula, keeping its shiny leaves in good condition through the winter, and often retaining a few flowers right through to Christmas. This is a variety with deep maroon flowers with a yellow eye, and reputedly a smell of aniseed, although that is not obvious.
primula_poissonii2.jpg Primula wilsonii has whorls of extremely bright, rich pink flowers with yellow eyes. It is the latest of the candelabra primulas to flower with us and in the wild, and we may even have a few flowers remaining until Christmas.
primula_wilsonii4.jpg Primula wilsonii var. wilsonii is a form with deep, dusky purple flowers, with a yellow eye. It is evergreen, keeping its shiny leaves in good condition through the winter, and often retaining a few flowers right through to Christmas.