Primula cf. farinosa

Primulaceae

 

Habitat: moist meadows; partial shade

 

Soil: humus-rich, moist

 

Height: 15 cm

 

Flowering: late spring to early summer

 

Width: 10 cm

  primula_farinosa.jpg   primula_farinosa2.jpg   primula_farinosa3.jpg


  Primula farinosa   Primula farinosa   Primula farinosa

This large section, formerly known as Farinosae, is found right round the northern hemisphere, and also includes the one species from South America. The well-known British brid's-eye primrose, Primula farinosa, is a typical member of the section, with good heads of bright pink flowers over rosettes of leaves that are slightly mealy on the upper side and very mealy below.

Primula cf. farinosa is, as its name suggests, a floury primula. It has lots of farina on the undersides of the green leaves and on the yellow-centred pink flowers. It is widespread in the mountains of Europe, and it a British native, albeit with a very restricted distribution.
BFK-9
9 cm pot £5.00

Primula Aleuritia section - some other suggestions
primula_darialica.jpg Primula darialica is quite like the well-known Primula frondosa and farinosa, with rosettes of slightly mealy leaves and heads of bright pink flowers.
primula_farinosa3.jpg Primula farinosa var. denudata is one of those plants that makes nonsense of names: it is the form of the floury (farinose) primula that doesn't have any flour! It doesn't have any hairs on the leaves, either, so at least the 'denudata' but of the name makes sense. Otherwise it is typical of this lovely little primula, found in wet meadows through Europe and much of northern Asia.
primula_halleri.jpg Primula halleri is a European species, once known as Primula longiflora, reflecting the very long, narrow tubes of the bright, lilac-pink flowers. These are in a cluster of around half a dozen, but sometimes many more, on a stem that is a little too long for aesthetic comfort. It is therefore best to grow a group of plants. Usually grown in an open position in the rock garden, it is said to live much longer in wet, humus-rich places.
invisible.gif Primula incana has a low rosette of leaves and a cluster of quite small white flowers, separated by a rather long stem - 30 cm or sometimes more. The Americans call this the 'silvery primrose', which sounds good. It comes from North Dakota, Idaho, and neighbouring regions of Canada.
primula_laurentiana3.jpg Primula laurentiana comes from eastern North America. This species makes rosettes of soft leaves with farina underneath, with relatively tall flower stems carrying a few pale pink flowers with notched petals and a yellow eye.
primula_luteola.jpg Primula luteola comes from the Caucasus, and has a rosettes of dark green leaves, with upright stems carrying dense heads of sulfur yellow flowers. It is much large than most members of the section, and unusually does not have farina on the leaves.
primula_modesta_fauriei.jpg Primula modesta var. fauriae is a pretty little Primula from Japan and neighbouring areas. It has a small rosette of leaves with yellowish farina underneath. In this variety the flowers are pale pink or white, a little smaller than in other varieties and on a slightly longer stem. Although not long-lived, it will grow well, without a cover, in rockeries, raised beds and troughs, and if several are grown together, will provide seed.
invisible.gif Primula modesta var. samanimontana is a variant of this pretty little species. It has a small rosette of leaves with yellowish farina underneath. In this variety the flowers are pale pink or white. Although not long-lived, it will grow well, without a cover, in rockeries, raised beds and troughs, and if several are grown together, will provide seed.
primula_scotica.jpg Primula scotica is found wild only in Scotland, and is the only species of plant to claim that distinction, apart from some apomictic Sorbus. It is tiny; just little rosettes of grey-green leaves, and a short, upright stem with a few deep red-purple flowers with yellow eyes. It is usually monocarpic, but should be kept going from seed, provided you have several plants to ensure fertilisation. Well worth growing, and well worth and examining closely!
invisible.gif Primula stenocalyx is a pretty little primula, probably best in a special place in the garden or in a pot, but kept from full sun, and always at least damp. It has compact rosettes of leaves that are mealy underneath, with short stems carrying an umbel of a few pale pink flowers. These normally appear in late spring, but there can be a second flowering in late summer.
primula_scandinavica.jpg Primula yuparensis is a species that comes only from one mountain in Japan (Mt. Yubari). It is an Asian relative of Primula farinosa from Europe and Primula mistassinica from America. It has rosettes of farinose leaves, with heads of large, bright pink flowers.