Eriogonum ovalifolium

Polygonaceae

 

Habitat: sunny places

 

Soil: gritty, well drained

 

Height: 30 cm

 

Flowering: late spring to early summer

 

Width: 30 cm

           


           

The name buckwheat means different things in different places, but in North America it refers to plants in the genus Eriogonum. This is large genus, including mat-forming alpines and shrubs, and everything in between. They come mainly from hot, summer-dry regions, and have silvery-grey, finely hairy leaves, as in common in such habitats. However, it is our relatively warm, wet winters that are not good for some of them. But with cover in an alpine house or greenhouse, or outside with winter protection, the alpine kinds can make most attractive plants. In some species the flowers, which come in clusters are tiny, so they look like little coloured buttons, but in others they are larger, giving spherical heads. The flowers are often yellow or white, but may also be pink, red or orange, and can vary from plant to plant of the same species, or even with time on the same plant.

Eriogonum ovalifolium is a species of wild buckwheat known as 'Cushion buckwheat' from western North America, with off-white flowers above striking vertical, woolly oval leaves.
EOQ-9
9 cm pot £5.00

Eriogonum - some other suggestions
eriogonum_umbellatum.jpg Eriogonum umbellatum makes loose mats of leaves, green above and grey below. Erect stems carry the tiny pale yellow flowers in spherical clusters, but as the flowers fade they change to orange or red. In America it is known as the sulphur-flowers buckwheat
invisible.gif Eriogonum umbellatum var. porteri is an alpine perennial from mountian ridges in Utah. It is compact in habit and has shiny green leaves on short woody stems. The flowers open yellow but turn to red as they age.
eriogonum_umbellatum.jpg Eriogonum cf. umbellatum makes loose mats of leaves, green above and grey below. Erect stems carry the tiny pale yellow flowers in spherical clusters, but as the flowers fade they change to orange or red. This is from Wyoming, where it is sometimes known as the sulphurflower buckwheat.